;
Attending a town hall? Public debate? Meet and greet? Ask these important questions before you cast a ballot!

Shane Darby

Learn more about Shane's stances below.

  • Shane Darby

  • About Shane

  • 1
  • House
  • I grew up in the 1st Representative District, where I live with my three daughters. I serve as Wilmington’s 2nd District Council member and I’m the founder of Black Mothers in Power which focuses on health equity. I am a Community Organizer that mobilizes people to address systemic issues and social problems. I also serve as an NCO paralegal in the military.
    I am the mother of three beautiful girls. I was born and raised in our district to an immigrant Jamaican mother and stepfather. Proud of my roots, I have decided to raise my family around the corner, in a community I believe in.
    Our community has been in my blood since the beginning. Towards the end of my senior year at Mount Pleasant High School, I became pregnant with my first daughter. Despite knowing the tough road ahead, I continued my education at Temple University, earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Mass Communication & African Studies, and a Master’s Degree in Africana Studies.
    Motherhood paired with these passions would inspire me to later establish Black Mothers in Power. Black Mothers in Power is a statewide, non-profit organization founded on empowering Black Mothers by building awareness, creating educational programming and lobbying for legislation addressing racial inequity among mothers in our community. I also recently completed training to become a Postpartum Doula.
    Professionally, I witness the inequality our youth face on a daily basis. As a Child Behavioral Therapist, I worked closely with children who have experienced trauma and/or have behavioral issues. My experience has provided insight in the lack of community resources and youth development, as well as supplanting my passion for reinvigorating youth projects; focused on establishing local community centers and extra-curricular activities that teach our kids the necessary skills to succeed in all walks of life.
    Like most of us today the need for housing reform, criminal justice reform, and protection for the working class and Wilmington’s poor families are the most pressing concerns on my mind. I realized I needed to take a more direct approach to community activism, transforming my ability as a community organizer into a tangible leadership position within my hometown.
    My efforts collaborating with others have provided me with the necessary network and professional skill set to affect legislative change in our community through grassroots initiatives. I am solution-oriented and results-driven and as your State Representative, I will be the connector between ALL neighborhoods in the 1st District.

  • Candidate Questions

  • Education Equity

  • Yes

    Specifically in our education system, we need to implement programs and positions that are effective in reducing and preventing violence in schools. Many other schools throughout the country have done this by replacing out-dated, ineffective systems & positions to fund programs like Dads on Duty (DOD). DOD is a crisis intervention school team of father’s and father figures of the children who attend that particular middle and high school. This team has a strong presence on school campuses and after school activities. This reduced police presence on campus which will reduce the criminalization of our children, increase school safety (less fights and proper conflict resolution).

    Article: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dads-on-duty-louisiana-school-update/

    Currently, I am working with advocates in education to implement the Dads on Duty program in the Red Clay School District. As a state rep I will sponsor legislation to end the school to prison pipeline by investing in counseling and peer to peer support structures, not suspensions and policing.

    We need to fundamentally shift the way we keep our students and school staff safe—retrofitting old systems and buildings to be accessible and promote physical and mental health, and committing to restorative justice programs that will end the school-to-prison pipeline and help our young people truly thrive in academics and beyond.

  • Yes

    Restorative Justice practices empowers students to resolve conflicts on their own. Studies show that there is a drastic reduction in suspension and expulsion rates, in which students say they are happier and feel safer. This is one tool needed to create positive environments for students to learn and thrive. Ensure full funding for strong public schools, including healing-centered and community schools.

  • Immigrants’ Rights

  • Yes

    As a first generation American, I understand first hand some of the immigration issues. I will support legislation so undocumented children and families have access to the social safety net, including for, healthcare, housing, jobs, and education.

  • Yes

    I will support policies that will end the criminalization of undocumented communities including, prohibiting all local law enforcement and state agencies from conspiring with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Patrol (CBP). As a state rep from a sanctuary city, I will be an advocate so every immigrant in Delaware can live with respect and dignity.

  • Smart Justice

  • Yes

    Delawareans who police have shot include Lymond Moses, who was taking a nap in his car, Jeremy McDole, who was in a wheelchair at the time, Yahim Harris, who was 18 years old when police put him in the hospital with several gunshot wounds, and Brandon Roberts, who called 911 for assistance with a mental health crisis.

    Police violence is a leading cause of death for young men of color in America, especially Black men.

    So I am actually in support of repealing LEOBOR. We are in need of long overdue changes needed in our criminal justice system. Since 2005, Delaware police have shot more than 56 people, with officers killing over 30 of them. Nearly half of those shot were Black people. More specifically, in September 2015 Jeremy McDole was shot and killed by WPD after being robbed and needing police assistance. Then AG Matt Denn, along with current AG Kathy Jennings have both expressed that the actions of the responding officers were unjust and "extraordinarily poor police work" and though the desire to charge these officers existed, current state law (LEOBOR) prevents them from doing so. As Jennings has said "we cannot undo the tragedies of the past, but we can work to prevent them from reoccurring." As a State Representative, I support the necessary changes, including but not limited to: changes in police training procedures, mental health professionals being added to response teams and creating a more diverse police force that more closely mirrors the make-up of our community.

  • Yes

    Local Community Oversight Boards are needed for all police departments in Delaware. Each board should have investigative authority and the power to make discipline binding. With police institutions holding power to deprive people of their liberties and their life, we must hold police officers accountable for (1) unjustified use of deadly force against community members, and (2) other violations and grievances that go unresolved and result in distrust from community members .Police officers who are violent towards our communities need to be held accountable for this misconduct. I have been vocal about police reform as a councilperson.

  • Yes

    At the same time the DOC must significantly improve the programming it provides to those in custody and on probation. As a state rep, I will support legislation so Delaware can provide comprehensive resources and infrastructure for Delawareans returning back from home from prison. Delaware must increase resources for formerly incarcerated people, particularly investing in guaranteed transitional housing that has wrap-around services including mental health treatment, job training, and peer counseling.

  • Yes

    Yes, I will support this legislation. We also must end cycles of incarceration and instability by providing incarcerated and formerly incarcerated Delawareans with support and resources - providing healthcare, employment, educational, and reentry support for those returning home from incarceration.

  • Yes

    If all charges have been terminated individuals should have this right. While we work to cut off the numerous pipelines that feed into the mass incarceration system, we must also improve the conditions of those who are incarcerated and work to ensure that our penal system is centered around rehabilitation rather than punishment.

  • Yes

    Fines and Fees should not be a barrier to expungement. Criminalization of poverty needs to end. Low-income Delawareans are too often funneled into the criminal justice system, as if our society is too poor or uncreative to do something different. Whether it is a fine for loitering while forced to live on the streets or minor traffic infractions, low income Delawareans are often criminalized for simply being poor. Rather than providing real economic opportunities to low income, Delaware has systematically incarcerated them, which only further exacerbates their financial problems, as they are then saddled with crippling fines and the loss of employment. We also must end fines and fees as a barrier to expungement eligibility.

    As a councilperson, I am currently addressing local fee and fine reform by establishing a taskforce and taking the initiative to apply for Wilmington to be a part of the National Fines and Fines Justice Center program for Cities and Counties. Both of these initiatives will allow for meaningful fine and fee reform that will make the world better for people and for the government. Here the link to learn more about the program:
    https://www.policylink.org/ccffj

  • Reproductive Freedom

  • Yes

    Abortion is healthcare. Health care is a human right and insurance matters. Without it, people suffer more and die younger. Cost or stigma should not be a barrier to access to cover the cost of an abortion. I strongly support expanding medicaid to cover the costs of an aborition, as well as major new state investments to provide universal health care for all residents.

  • Yes

    I support a state constitutional amendment to protect peoples’ access to reproductive healthcare. This will make this right permanent and establish reproductive healthcare as a state priority.

  • Yes

    Being pregnant while Black in America shouldn’t be deadly. As a state, we must propose a path forward to address the structural racism and implicit bias that pervades our healthcare system, expand paid time-to-care benefits, and ultimately, save lives. Delawareans, especially those of color, are facing a maternal health emergency. Every pregnant person, regardless of color, immigration status, insurance, disability, language, or pre-existing mental health, substance abuse or physical condition should be able to have a safe and joyous birthing experience. I would support the creation of a fully-funded Reproductive Healthcare Equity Fund.

  • Voting Rights

  • Yes

    We must ensure all Delawareans’s voices are heard and their votes counted. Rigid voting laws disenfranchise voters of color, particularly the most marginalized groups.

  • Yes

    Yes. We must expand voting rights by allowing all voters to vote by mail and expand early voting. Amid a national tide of anti-voter measures that threaten our elections and disenfranchise individuals and populations, Delaware has an opportunity to stand as a model, but only if we make it a priority.

  • Yes

    Once you serve your time and return home, most people should not continue to be punished for the crime they committed. The right to vote should not be held against you.

Pledge To Vote In The 2022 Primary And General Elections

The issues you care about are on the ballot in 2022. Sign on to our pledge to receive updates about our ACLU Voter campaign, including opportunities to assist with voter registration, education, and candidates’ forums.