;
Attending a town hall? Public debate? Meet and greet? Ask these important questions before you cast a ballot!

Eric Morrison

Learn more about Eric's stances below.

  • Eric Morrison

  • About Eric

  • 27
  • House
  • Since November 2020, it has been both my honor and my pleasure to serve as state representative for the 27th District. I am a lifelong Delawarean. I grew up downstate and graduated in 1996 from the University of Delaware Honors Program with an English major, a history minor, and a concentration in Ethnic & Cultural Studies. I have worked as an educator, in Medicaid and Medicare, and in human resources.

    Since the age of thirteen, I have been very involved in my community. As an adult, I have held long-term leadership positions in community organizations and nonprofits including Delaware Pride and Delaware United. Also, I have volunteered for numerous community organizations like AIDS Delaware, the Rainbow Chorale of Delaware, and Faithful Friends. I have volunteered regularly at the Food Bank of Delaware for over 15 years.

    Before taking office, I participated extensively in local and state politics for several years as an activist and as an organizer. I worked to help pass important legislation, organized events to help educate the community about political and social issues, and planned candidate forums and debates. Also, I held “boots on the ground” and leadership roles in the campaigns of progressive Democratic candidates and elected officials at local, statewide, and federal levels.

    In my spare time, I enjoy reading, watching documentaries, and spending time with my wonderful family and friends.

  • Candidate Questions

  • Education Equity

  • Yes

    We know from studies and real-life experiences that there are more effective measures proven to keep schools safe than SROs and constables. They do not prevent or stop mass shootings. They are very expensive compared to the results we receive. Their presence leads to unnecessary arrests for often minor infractions that should be handled by school administration. This contributes to the school-to-prison pipeline and disproportionately affects students of color and students with disabilities. Also, SROs and constables in schools are frequently tied in with harsh “zero tolerance” policies that increase students’ chances of “reoffending” in the future. And studies have indicated that especially in schools primarily serving students of color, the presence of SROs and constables often makes students feel less safe and leads to unintended consequences like lower grades and attendance. We should invest instead in methods proven to lead to safer schools such as placing mental health professionals and social workers in them.

  • Yes

    We know that restorative justice works. It builds a sense of community and improves the lives of “offenders” while addressing and preventing conflict. For example, we know that students who receive counseling and/or learn important life skills like conflict resolution and anger management are much less likely to “reoffend” than students who face traditional punishments like detention and suspension.

  • Immigrants’ Rights

  • Yes

    It behooves all of society for undocumented children to be protected and cared for, including healthcare and the best education possible.

  • Yes
  • Smart Justice

  • Yes

    Police misconduct records should be made public. Police certainly should feel as safe as possible while performing their jobs—but Delawareans should feel safe when interacting with law enforcement officers. Delawareans should be able to access police misconduct records for various reasons—including understanding the records of law enforcement officers in their communities, questioning why law enforcement officers with a history of misconduct are still on the job, and looking to see if a law enforcement officer has a pattern of misconduct when they themselves have had a negative experience with that officer. Such accountability will increase trust in law enforcement and officers, which also makes officers safer.

  • Yes

    For many of the same reasons that making police misconduct records public makes sense, creating local community oversight boards for police departments makes sense. The community should have a voice in how they are policed, and community members deserve the utmost in transparency when it comes to law enforcement. This will help us move towards “community policing” which we know is more effective than other types of policing, and it creates trust between law enforcement offices and residents—making both safer. Also, it simply does not make sense to allow law enforcement agencies to be the sole entity investigating their officers when misconduct is suspected or alleged.

  • Yes

    America leads the world in mass incarceration. Delaware’s recidivism rate is extremely high and is unfortunately inflated due to policies like incarcerating individuals on probation who have not committed a new crime. This is not to mention the very high financial cost of keeping individuals incarcerated. It benefits all of us to allow individuals on probation to remain in their communities so they can keep jobs, maintain housing, pay their bills, and be present with their families and their communities.

  • Yes

    time-consuming to navigate—and many individuals who are eligible for expungement do not even realize it. Also, expunging records for these individuals benefits us all, as it allows these individuals to pursue a life that will be the best not just for them but for all of society.

  • Yes

    There is no reason why such cases should not be expunged from these individuals’ records. Not only is it the right and just thing to do, but it allows these individuals to pursue a life that will be the best not just for them but for all of society.

  • Yes

    Many individuals eligible for expungement simply cannot afford to pay all of their fines and fees, at least not immediately. For these individuals, we are doing them and society a great disservice by not allowing their records to be expunged before all fines and fees have been paid. Also, the policy is nonsensical. For example, a record may prevent such individuals from obtaining work or obtaining a good-paying job, making them less likely to be able to pay their fines and fees.

  • Reproductive Freedom

  • Yes

    Although Medicaid funds cannot be used to pay for abortion services due to the Hyde Amendment, I fully support establishing a state program that will pay for abortion services for women eligible for Medicaid.

  • Yes

    I support such an amendment, as I believe that reproductive healthcare—including abortion—should be as protected as possible for all Delawareans.

  • Yes

    I support such a fund. It would benefit not just some individuals, but in the end, Delaware as a whole.

  • Voting Rights

  • Yes

    I support any legislation that seeks to eliminate the disenfranchisement of voters of color. What we see in many parts of America today, in terms of this issue, is frightening. Delaware can and should lead the nation on this issue. Further, I support any legislation that makes voting as easy and accessible as possible for all Delawareans.

  • Yes

    Including these two recommendations, I support any policies and legislation that makes voting as easy and accessible as possible for all Delawareans.

  • Yes

    I support such legislation. These individuals are governed by the laws of our society and therefore should have a say in who makes these laws. We also know that the criminal justice system is fundamentally flawed and biased against people of color and people of a lower socioeconomic status. Not allowing former inmates to vote disproportionately impacts individuals in those communities. And especially since we have such a flawed and biased criminal justice system, individuals who have often been negatively and unfairly treated by it should have a say in reforming that system. They understand more than anyone the policies and laws we can institute that will help individuals rehabilitate and reintegrate into society upon leaving prison.

Pledge To Vote In The 2022 Primary And General Elections

The issues you care about are on the ballot in 2022. Sign on to our pledge to receive updates about our ACLU Voter campaign, including opportunities to assist with voter registration, education, and candidates’ forums.