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John Martin

Learn more about John's stances below.

  • John Martin

  • About John

  • Kent
  • Capital School District
  • At Large
  • Greetings,
    My name is John Martin. I am seeking reelection. My focus is student achievement and school board actions that focus on the things that matter for our students, their families, the educators that serve them and our community.

  • Candidate Questions

  • I define equity as the deliberate work to provide access for all and to dismantle the structures that stand in the way of equity for those who have been the casualties of infair practices.

  • I will review our budgets and advocate for putting our resources to use to create equity for the underserved students in our district. I welcome our constituents to let me know where they think our money and efforts should be directed to ensure success for Capital School District students.

  • I believe that school board members need professional development. Attending these powerful conferences have helped me learn to be a more effective board member. Here are three areas that will be my priority:
    1. Making data Driven Decisions by reviewing how money is spent and requesting ongoing public reports on progress and outcomes.
    2. Monitoring and Accountability as an extension of the first priority. The feedback on our student interventions, teacher recruitment, school safety, and community morale are strong indicators for the health of our district.
    3. Community Engagement to ensure that as a board member I am keenly listening to my constituents and responding to their concerns and suggestions for continuous improvement. This includes seeking feedback in the form of town hall meetings and online surveys.
    The areas represent a comprehensive focus. As our board continues to work on our strategic focus, my approach is similar to braiding hair; I start at point and as the braiding continues, a little more is woven in throughout the process. This also entails maintenance and, occasionally, the need to start fresh to stay fresh and up to date.

  • I believe that we are misconstruing accountability and support. Restorative Practices often are maligned because of an implementation gap. When done correctly, it helps to reform bullying behavior as well as restore the victims.
    Restorative practices and leadership take time to implement and integrate into community actions and expectations. As a board member who is also a proponent of restorative practices, I will use my voice and experience to help clarify misconceptions of what it is and is not.

  • Absolutely. I will take it a step further. I believe that all students need a comprehensive education. The push to focus on reading and math, at the expense of covering science and social studies is a hinderence to student satisfaction and engagement. Science and social studies helps our students become critical thinkers and broadens their palate for learning. In my opinion, and some researchers, this is a brain-based approach to learning that will create students that hinger to learn and read about the topics that some adults want to censor.

  • I support this statement. Schools should be inclusive of all members of our community. This includes those mentioned and others that have not been mentioned, for example age bias. There is a great opportunity to bring our senior community members into our schools to help fill the drastic need in the classrooms and hallways. In fact, we have retirees that have the ability and desire to help transform our schools into places that are safe, supportive, and effective.
    There is a tired mantra that I hear in Delaware and throughout the country. Our students are struggling because of the pandemic. Schools cannot get teachers to fill the classrooms. Businesses are saying the same thing.
    It is my belief that this is a winnable challenge. The victorious districts and businesses, will be the ones that think deeply about solutions instead of lamenting the woes they face. "I will stand on business" whenever I hear anyone talk about being dealt a poor hand. As an educator, I know that stories are effective communication tools. Card players, for example, those who play spades, poker, tonk, or pinochle know that the game comes down to how one plays the hand they are dealt. It is the same with education. What we do to serve our students, teachers, administrators, and our families will determine our outcomes.

  • I support this statement. This is a broad comment that requires clarity. Access to education is imperative. All students must have full rights to inclusion. There are some controversial matters, for example, in sports, where I stand firmly that sportsmanship and fairness is an equity issue that in some cases is misunderstood and in some areas, creates an unfair advantage that I am willing to speak to formally.

  • I believe that we are misconstruing accountability and support. Restorative Practices often are maligned because of an implementation gap. When done correctly, it helps to reform bullying behavior as well as restore the victims.
    Restorative practices and leadership take time to implement and integrate into community actions and expectations. As a board member who is also a proponent of restorative practices, I will use my voice and experience to help clarify misconceptions of what it is and is not.

  • I will make myself available to marginalized communities. I will galvanize them as a body and help them see the power of collective effort. I understand why many of the people in our community feel unappreciated. The time is ripe for them to hold leaders accountable. I will support them in this noble quest for equity and representation.

  • I absolutely believe this. Research shows that ALL students benefit from the rich exposure to a diverse set of teachers and administrators.

  • I am committed to the physical safety and welfare of our district. This means that we will need to address the underlying causes such as the pipes that transport water and our calling for our legislators and government officials to protect our local water source. This concern is larger than lead; there are other pollutants that affect our water and air and these need t be addressed too. Here is another reason why our students need science and social studies so that they can use their student voices to speak up for community health.

  • This is an area where our citizens need to speak up and hold our legislators accountable for the laws that determine how school districts are funded. This is a touchy topic; people in communities want local control. Furthermore, this topic speaks to individuals and communities beliefs. This topic will not be fixed through legislation alone; it will take courageous conversations to help foster the broad relationships that will see the benefit of supporting the greatest opportunity for every student as mutually beneficial for all.

Candidates listed below have yet to respond

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Smyrna

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Janet E. Maull-Martin (District C)

Delmar

Russell R. Smart (At Large)

Dawn M. Turner (At Large)

Indian River

Lisa Hudson Briggs (District 1)

Kelly Kline (District 1)

Mark L. Steele (District 3)

Joshua W. Hudson (District 4)

Anita West-Werner (District 4)

Derek E. Cathell (District 5)

Kim Law Taylor (District 5)

Laurel

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Seaford

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